Vermont’s Maple Trees: A Guide to the Different Types


The types of maple trees that grow in Vermont include Sugar Maple, Amur Maple, Ashleaf Maple, Norway Maple (considered invasive), Red Maple, Striped Maple, Silver Maple, and Black Maple.

Vermont is known for its maple trees, with one in every four trees in the state being a maple tree.

Maple trees grow almost everywhere in Vermont, especially in Orange County.

Maple trees are an important part of Vermont’s culture and economy. They are used to produce maple syrup, which is a major export for the state.

In this article, we will discuss the different types of maple trees prevalent in the state of Vermont.

Sugar Maple or Rock Maple (Acer saccharum)

This is the state tree of Vermont. It is known for its beautiful fall foliage, which turns red and yellow.

Sugar maple is the most common type of maple tree in Vermont, and it is the primary source of sap for maple syrup production.

Sugar maple is a large tree that can grow up to 100 feet tall.

It is a slow-growing tree that can live for over 300 years.

Amur Maple (Acer ginnala)

This is a small tree or large shrub that is often used as an ornamental plant. It is native to China and Japan and was introduced to North America in the 1800s.

Amur maple is a fast-growing tree that can reach a height of 20 feet.

It has attractive red fall foliage and produces small red fruits in the fall.

Ashleaf / Box Elder Maple (Acer negundo)

This is a fast-growing tree that is often used for landscaping. It is also known as box elder or Manitoba maple.

Ashleaf maple is a small to medium-sized tree that can grow up to 50 feet tall.

It has attractive yellow fall foliage and produces winged seeds in the fall.

Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)

This tree is not native to Vermont and is considered an invasive species.

It has increasingly been supplanting sugar maple in urbanized Vermont woods.

Norway maple is a large tree that can grow up to 100 feet tall.

It has attractive yellow fall foliage and produces winged seeds in the fall.

Red Maple (Acer rubrum)

Red maple is a common tree in Vermont, especially in wetland areas.

It is a medium-sized tree that can grow up to 70 feet tall.

Red maple has attractive red fall foliage and produces winged seeds in the fall.

It is also known as swamp maple or soft maple.

Striped Maple (Acer pensylvanicum)

Striped maple is a small to medium-sized tree that is native to Vermont. It is also known as moosewood or goosefoot maple.

Striped maple has attractive green and white striped bark and produces winged seeds in the fall.

It is a slow-growing tree that can live for over 100 years.

Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)

Silver maple is a common tree in Vermont, especially in wetland areas. It is a fast-growing tree that can grow up to 100 feet tall.

Silver maple has attractive silver-gray bark and produces winged seeds in the fall.

It is also known as soft maple or river maple.

Black Maple (Acer nigrum)

Black maple is a medium-sized tree that is native to Vermont. It is also known as hard maple or rock maple.

Black maple has attractive yellow fall foliage and produces winged seeds in the fall.

It is a slow-growing tree that can live for over 200 years.

Sources:

[1] https://books.google.com/books?dq=here%27s+an+expanded+version+of+the+article%3A%0A%0A%23%23+types+of+maple+trees+in+vermont%0A%0Avermont+is+known+for+its+maple+trees%2C+with+one+in+every+four+trees+in+the+state+being+a+maple+tree.+maple+trees+grow+almost+everywhere+in+vermont%2C+especially&hl=en&id=b6ZGAQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA59&ots=-zhV0tCuNR&pg=PA59&sa=X&sig=ACfU3U26cUI8RIoL0ZgrVq3mhQeo9rHn0g&source=bl&ved=2ahUKEwiOpILgkPuAAxXrSDABHaScCtIQ6AF6BAgAEAE

[2] https://www.vacd.org/resources/landowners/invasive-species/norway-maple/

[3] https://butternutmountainfarm.com/about-maple/blog/vermont-arbor-day-celebrating-the-mighty-maple-trees

[4] https://www.progardentips.com/maple-trees-in-vermont/

[5] https://statesymbolsusa.org/symbol/vermont/state-tree/sugar-maple

[6] https://happyvermont.com/2022/09/20/where-are-the-most-maple-trees-in-vermont/

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