6 Common Types of Maple Trees in PA


Pennsylvania is home to six types of maple trees, including the Norway Maple, Striped Maple, Sugar Maple, Red Maple, Silver Maple, and Boxelder.

1. Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)

The Norway Maple is a non-native species that is commonly found in Pennsylvania. It has large, dark green leaves and produces yellow flowers in the spring.

This tree is known for its hardiness and ability to thrive in a variety of soil types.

However, it is also considered an invasive species in some areas and can outcompete native plants.

2. Striped Maple (Acer pensylvanicum)

The Striped Maple is a small, deciduous understory tree that grows up to 4 meters tall.

It has greenish-yellow flowers that bloom in the spring and distinctive green and white striped bark.

This tree is often used for ornamental purposes due to its unique appearance.

3. Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)

The Sugar Maple is a native species that is known for its brilliant fall foliage. It has five-lobed leaves that are dark green in the summer and turn yellow, orange, and red in the fall.

This tree is also valued for its sap, which is used to make maple syrup.

Sugar Maples can grow up to 75 feet tall and are often used for shade.

4. Red Maple (Acer rubrum)

The Red Maple is another native species that is known for its red flowers and brilliant red fall foliage.

It has three-lobed leaves that are green in the summer and turn red in the fall.

This tree is often used for landscaping due to its attractive appearance and ability to grow in a variety of soil types.

5. Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)

The Silver Maple is a fast-growing species that is commonly found along streams and rivers in Pennsylvania.

It has five-lobed leaves that are light green in the summer and turn yellow in the fall.

This tree is often used for landscaping due to its fast growth rate and ability to provide shade.

6. Boxelder (Acer negundo)

The Boxelder is a close relative of the maple tree that is sometimes used as a substitute for sugar maple.

It has compound leaves with three to seven leaflets and produces winged seeds that are often called “helicopters.”

This tree is often found in wet areas and can grow up to 80 feet tall.

FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions about maple trees in Pennsylvania:

Q: Are maple trees native to Pennsylvania?

  • A: Yes, several species of maple trees, such as the Sugar Maple and Red Maple, are native to Pennsylvania.

Q: How tall do red maples typically grow in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Red maples in Pennsylvania typically reach about 50 feet in height. They have leaves with three to five shallow lobes and many teeth on the edges.

Q: Can all maple trees be used to make maple syrup?

  • A: No, only certain species of maple trees, such as the Sugar Maple, are used to make maple syrup. Other species may produce sap, but it is not suitable for syrup production.

Q: Are maple trees prone to any diseases or pests in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Yes, maple trees can be susceptible to diseases and pests such as verticillium wilt and aphids. It is important to monitor the trees for signs of damage and take appropriate action if necessary.

Q: Can maple trees be planted in urban areas in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Yes, many species of maple trees are well-suited to urban environments in Pennsylvania and can provide shade and other benefits to city residents.

Q: Are maple trees good for the environment in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Yes, maple trees provide a variety of environmental benefits in Pennsylvania, such as reducing air pollution, providing habitat for wildlife, and helping to prevent soil erosion.

Q: How can I identify a Norway maple tree in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Norway maple trees can be distinguished from other types of maple trees by their leaves and twigs, which ooze milky white sap when cut or torn. Additional information on how to identify Norway maple can be found online.

Q: Are there any native alternatives to Norway maple in Pennsylvania?

  • A: Yes, there are native alternatives to Norway maple that can be planted in Pennsylvania. Some examples include Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum), Red Maple (Acer rubrum), and Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum).

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