Maple Trees in New Hampshire: Four Most Common Types


The four most common types of maple trees found in New Hampshire are the Sugar Maple, Red Maple, Black Maple, and Striped Maple.

Striped Maple (Acer pensylvanicum)

The Striped Maple, also known as Moosewood, is a small to medium-sized tree that is native to the eastern United States and Canada.

It is named for its distinctive green and white striped bark, which is smooth and shiny when young but becomes rough and furrowed as the tree ages.

Other notable features of the Striped Maple include:

  • Leaves: The leaves of the Striped Maple are large and have three lobes. They turn a bright yellow color in the fall.
  • Flowers: The Striped Maple produces small, yellow-green flowers in the spring.
  • Habitat: The Striped Maple is typically found in moist, shady areas such as stream banks and forest understories.

Red Maple (Acer rubrum)

The Red Maple is a medium to large-sized tree that is native to eastern North America.

It is named for its red twigs and buds, as well as its red flowers and fruit.

Other notable features of the Red Maple include:

  • Leaves: The leaves of the Red Maple are medium-sized and have three to five lobes. They turn a brilliant red color in the fall.
  • Flowers: The Red Maple produces small, red flowers in the early spring.
  • Habitat: The Red Maple is adaptable to a wide range of soil types and can be found in a variety of habitats, from wetlands to upland forests.

Black Maple (Acer nigrum)

The Black Maple is a medium to large-sized tree that is native to the eastern United States and Canada.

It is named for its dark, furrowed bark and its black twigs and buds.

Other notable features of the Black Maple include:

  • Leaves: The leaves of the Black Maple are large and have five lobes. They turn a yellow-orange color in the fall.
  • Flowers: The Black Maple produces small, greenish-yellow flowers in the spring.
  • Habitat: The Black Maple is typically found in moist, well-drained soils in lowland areas.

Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)

The Sugar Maple is a large-sized tree that is native to the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada.

It is named for its sweet sap, which is used to make maple syrup.

Other notable features of the Sugar Maple include:

  • Leaves: The leaves of the Sugar Maple are large and have five lobes. They turn a brilliant orange-red color in the fall.
  • Flowers: The Sugar Maple produces small, yellow-green flowers in the spring.
  • Habitat: The Sugar Maple is typically found in well-drained soils in upland forests.

FAQ

Q: What is maple sugaring?

A: Maple sugaring is the process of collecting sap from maple trees and boiling it down to make maple syrup.

Q: When is maple sugaring season in New Hampshire?

A: Maple sugaring season typically runs from late February to early April in New Hampshire.

Q: How many maple trees are tapped in New Hampshire each year?

A: According to the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association, there are over 5 million taps in New Hampshire each year.

Q: What is the largest sugar maple tree in New Hampshire?

A: The largest sugar maple tree in New Hampshire stood for over 200 years before being taken down in Kensington.

Q: What is the economic impact of maple sugaring in New Hampshire?

A: According to the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association, maple sugaring contributes over $150 million to the state’s economy each year.

Sources:

[1] https://www.nationalforests.org/blog/the-state-of-maple-on-the-white-mountain-national-forest

[2] https://www.progardentips.com/maple-trees-in-new-hampshire/

[3] https://www.visitnh.gov/seasonal-trips/spring/Maple-Sugaring

[4] https://fpr.vermont.gov/sites/fpr/files/Forest_and_Forestry/Forest_Based_Business/Library/2012%20Forests_of_VT_and_NH.pdf

[5] https://extension.unh.edu/blog/2020/10/scouting-sugar-maples

[6] https://sugarhillinn.com/blog/2018/02/maple-sugaring-season-white-mountains/

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